Walking Idioms

Are you a walking disaster? Or do you like to be on the wallaby? Do you wish to walk tall? Or do you wish to understand what I am saying?? Well, if it is the last one, go on and read more to find out the literal meaning of the idioms.

WALK TALL
SENTENCE-: The President walk tall.
MEANING-: justifiable pride
GO WALKABOUT
SENTENCE-: Where are you going? Umm, no we are just taking a walk about.
MEANING-: wander around from place to place in a protracted or leisurely way.
GO WALKIES
SENTENCE-: The police is extensively searching for Akash, after all he was the only one who went walkies.
MEANING-: go missing, especially as a result of theft
A WALKING
SENTENCE-: Avinash has been a walking disaster for Uttarakhand.
MEANING-: someone who notably embodies the characteristics of something.
DRIVE SOMEONE UP THE WALL
SENTENCE-: Don’t drive me up the wall, you are not ready yet to face the consequences.
MEANING-: make someone very irritated or angry
UP AGAINST THE WALL
SENTENCE-: the disaster led thousands of people up against the wall.
MEANING-: in great trouble or difficulty
ON THE WALLABY
SENTENCE-: millions of people were on the wallaby during the great depression of the 1930s.
MEANING-: unemployed and having no fixed address
A WAR OF NERVES
SENTENCE-: We are often caught in the war of nerves with our colleagues.
MEANING-: a struggle in which opponents try to wear each other down by psychological means.
A WAR OF WORDS
SENTENCE-: With the coming of INTERNET, war of word is the most common thing to notice.
MEANING-: prolonged debate conducted by means of spoken or printed word
HAVE BEEN IN THE WAR
SENTENCE-: I know how the blood looks like because I have been in the war.
MEANING-: have been hurt or injured

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