FAQs For Phase Three Of The Speaking Test

FAQs for Phase Three of the Speaking Test

Frequently asked questions about Phase Three of the speaking test.

What is it?

Phase Three is also called the “extended discourse” phase, which basically means that you have the opportunity to talk about things in detail.

How long does it last?

It should last between 4 and 5 minutes.

How do I know when it’s started?

The examiner will ask you a question requiring a short answer at the end of your Phase Two presentation to stop you and then (s)he will explain that in Phase Three you will be asked some more general questions related to the topic in Phase Two.

What are the topics about?

The topic you are asked questions about will be related to the topic in Phase Two.

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Speaking Test Tips

SPEAKING TEST TIPS

SPEAKING TEST TIPS:

Tips:

1. Don’t try to memorise answers to topics because the examiner will know this is what you are doing when you speak. It is much better to just try to communicate as best as you can with the examiner.

2. You are marked on how naturally you speak English, not how quickly or how long. Try to communicate with the examiner as you would with other people and don’t just try to “fill” the time with words.

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Improve your Speaking IELTS score

improve your Speaking IELTS score

 

Everyone knows that the person’s first language affects the way they sound when they speak English. For example a person whose first language is Arabic will sound different speaking English from a person whose first language is Polish. But do you know why?

The answer is simple: mouth position. Mouth position means whether your mouth is open or closed most of the time when you speak (whether your jaws, upper and lower teeth, are close together or wide apart).

Many people automatically use the mouth position typical to their first language when speaking English and it makes their speech harder to understand. The reason we’re bringing this up is that once you know what affects your pronunciation, you can work on it, and thus improve your Speaking IELTS score.

Georgie Taylor, a Speech Pathologist and accent specialist with over 9 years of experience, says that to speak English more like a native speaker (and therefore more clearly) you need to open and close your mouth quite a lot – compared to languages such as Japanese, Cantonese or Russian
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Phase 2 Tips : Speaking Test

Phase 2 Tips- Speaking Test

In Phase 2 of the speaking test. You are asked to make a presentation on a topic. It will always be something person, like talking about a holiday you went on. After the test, many candidates suggest they didn’t know about the topic which is why they couldn’t answer the question. Clearly, this can’t be the case. What they mean is they couldn’t answer the question because they couldn’t think of what to say. If this is the case for you, during the one minute you have to prepare, brainstorm your answer. For example, the assessor my ask you to talk about a holiday you really enjoyed. On you piece of paper, write down questions words:

Where?
When?
Why?
What?
Who with?
How?
Etc.

When you have asked the questions, answer them:

Where? Dehradun
When? last year
Why? celebrate end exams
What? climbed hills / water rafting
Who with? uni friends
How? bus from Delhi to Dehradun Etc.
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